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New Year's Eve Celebration - Historic Kent Manor Inn

Join us to Stay and Dine to Ring in a Relaxing New Year.

Choice of 3-, 4-, or 5-course menu.

Each course can be paired with wines.

Packages are available to include a

one-night stay, four-course dinner for two and breakfast buffet the next morning.

Special New Year’s Eve room amenities.

New Year’s Day activities can be added to overnight packages such as on-site massages to help you start the New Year off with relaxation.

Call 41-643-7716 or email amy@kentmanor.com for more information or for reservations.

Christmas Eve Buffet - Historic Kent Manor Inn

Celebrate the Christmas Holiday and Leave the Cooking To Us!

First seating at 4:00 pm and last leisurely seating at 8:00 pm

$36 per person, children 6-12 half price, 5 & under free.  Price includes all non-alcoholic beverages.

Chef's succulent menu includes:

Maple Glazed Black Forest Ham

 with Blood Orange Port Wine Glaze

Char Grilled Chicken

 with Chanterelle Mushroom Green Peppercorn Demi Glaze

Pan Seared Atlantic Salmon

 with Chardonnay Steamed Mussels and Pink Peppercorn Cream

 Grilled Venison and Quail Casseoulet

 with White Beans and Smoked Duck

Roasted Acorn Squash and Lobster Bread Pudding

 with Caramelized Fennel and Thyme

Call today for reservations at 410-643-7716 or email amy@kentmanor.com

The Good Farm: A shore gal's adventure with organic farming, sustainability and eating locally!

by Christie McDowell

Organic growing is everything to me.

I started my journey with organic growing four years ago. It is a full-time passion, hobby, exercise, lifestyle, mindset; and part time job. My produce has been purchased by restaurants, a health food store, traded to restaurants, used as landscape and interior decoration, bartered to a commercial fisherman for seafood, given to friends, and it feeds my ducks and chickens on occasion.

Several years ago I asked Nino Mancari (chef at the time at Solstice Grill at the Atlantic Hotel in Berlin) how important it was to him if the produce he bought was certified organic or not. He said that if it was certified organic and shipped from Costa Rica, it defeated some of the greater purpose by adding to the carbon footprint. He said he would far prefer something grown naturally, locally. He also realized there was a far greater chance of having me patronize his restaurant than having the owners of Sysco or some other corporate food distributorship come in for a meal. We talked about the economics of sourcing locally and keeping resources within our own community.

Let’s Can Apples

by JR Coffey

The smell of cooking apples seem to say Fall.  It is that smell and taste that we want to capture in the canning jar.  I believe Fall is one of the busiest times in regard to canning and preserving.  Many fruits are in during the Fall season, including grapes, apples, pears, plums and figs.  Let’s get started canning! 

The varieties of apples are endless.  I prefer Golden Delicious to can for Baking, Ginger Gold for Apple Chutney, Winesaps, Grimes Golden or my favorite Northern Spy for applesauce and apple butter.  The early apples such as Summer Rambo and Transparent are good for sauce and cooking as well.  I use the same apples for pies as for sauce.

Apples for Baking

1 gallon apples, peeled and quartered

1 C. sugar

1 t. Fruit Fresh

Mix sugar and fruit fresh and sprinkle over apples.  Cover and let stand overnight.  Next morning, pack apples into clean jars, leaving ¾” headspace.  Add hot water to juice left in container and dissolve sugar and divide liquid among the jars.  Add more water to fill jars to within ¾” headspace.  Wipe jar rims, seal and process (cold pack) 5 to 10 minutes in boiling water bath.  Do half gallon jars 15 minutes.  Do not process too long or they will turn to sauce instead.  Golden Delicious are excellent canned this way.

A slight variation is to use 2 to 3 pounds sugar for a 5 gallon container of prepared apples.  To serve, put your apples in a casserole dish.  Sprinkle with about ¼ C. brown sugar and dot with about 1 or 2 T. butter.  Bake at 300 degrees for 45 to 60 minute.

Apple Pie Filling

Please see Peach column for my pie filling to can recipe.  Just add 1 T. ground cinnamon per double batch of glaze for each ½ bushel of apples.  This will can 14 to 16 quarts each time.  You could add some apple pie spice (1 to 2 t.) instead of or in addition to the cinnamon.  Some also like about a teaspoon of vanilla as well in apple pie filling.

Let’s Can Tomatoes

by James R. Coffey

It is hard to believe August is here and Fall is around the corner.  Hopefully everyone is stocking their canning shelves with food for the coming Winter season.  This article will deal with several ways to preserve tomatoes by canning, juices, soup and sauces.  I am hearing that tomatoes are very plentiful so let’s start canning them.  Several sources for canning supplies are your local Walmart, Good’s Store in Quarryville, PA. And also Byler’s Store in Dover, DE.  Check at also local hardware and also within your bulk food stores if you are near an Amish/Mennonite community.

Plain Solid Pack Tomatoes

Peel, core and remove hard green spots.  Leave whole, halve or quarter.  Pack tightly into clean jars, pressing down so juice will cover them.  Leave 1” headspace.  Add NO water! Add 1 t. canning salt to a quart or ½ t. canning salt to a pint.  Add also ½ t. citric acid to each quart or ¼ t. citric acid to a pint. If you do not have citric acid use: 2 T. Realemon juice to a quart or 1 T. Realemon juice to a pint.  You may add also ½-1 t. sugar if you desire as well.  Do not omit either the citric acid or the lemon juice in any canned tomato recipe.  Wipe jar rims, seal and process by one of the methods below:

Hot Water Bath: Pints: 20 minutes; Quarts and Half Gallons: 30 minutes.

Pressure Canner: Pints and Quarts: 15 minutes at 5 pounds pressure or 10 minutes at 10 pounds pressure.  Half Gallons should be fine for the same time.

The USDA recommends all raw packed tomatoes be processed 85 minutes in the boiling water bath.  This is overkill in my opinion and results in mush.  My time follows the old recommendations and that in other areas of the United States.  Be sure not to can a low acid tomatoes.  I always use a high acid type to can.  For easy peeling, wash tomatoes and drop in boiling water.  Leave ½ minutes.  Remove and put in cold water.  Leave about 30 seconds and the skins will slip off.  I like mine still warm to peel quick. For all raw packed cold tomatoes, I have cold water in my canner and I do not time it until the water is at a rolling boil.  For all hot packed jars, use hot water.  If you forget, you will have broken jars either way.

Let's Can Peaches II

Recipes by James R Coffey

Peach Pie Filling

4 to 6 quarts prepared fruit, as for canning

2 C. Clear Jell (Check at Amish Bulk Food Stores or on line)

2 C. cold water

7 C. sugar

1 t. canning salt

6 C. water

Mix clear jell and 2 C. cold water until smooth.  Combine the sugar, salt and remaining  6 C. water and  bring to a boil.  Add clear jell mixture and cook until thick and clear.  Add fruit.  Fill jars, leaving 1 to 1 ½ inches of headspace.  Wipe jar rims, seal and process by one of the methods given below:

Water Bath (pints and quarts): 30 minutes

Pressure Canner: (pints and quarts): 10 minutes at 5 pounds pressure.

I only can Fruit Pie Fillings in my pressure canner as I feel it makes mush of fruit otherwise.  I use this for Peaches, Apples (add 1 to 2 t. cinnamon), Blueberries, Cherries (can add red coloring and a little almond flavoring, if desired), Blackberry, Apricot and other berries.

Let’s Get Peachy! Canning Peaches Volume 1

by James R. Coffey

It is hard to believe, but fresh peaches are starting to show up in markets and probably will be early due to all of the warm weather we have had here this year.  My next several articles will be on preserving peaches in several different ways.  I hope to do one on tomatoes as well as we approach August and September.  Some of my favorite varieties are Red Haven, Sun High, Loring, and Elberta.  I would say my absolute favorite is Red Haven.  I call them “If-y Stone Peaches!”.  The reason is sometimes they are freestone and sometimes they want to cling to the stone and they have to be cut off, but no other compares for flavor and the ability not to darken. 

There are several methods of preserving peaches.  I prefer canning them.  Freezing is easy as well.  Just peel, pit, slice and sprinkle a little sugar on them and add a little Fruit Fresh according to package directions and freeze.  Red Haven will really keep their color.  You can also grind them, add the Fruit Fresh and freeze in recipe amounts for jams, cakes and other uses.

Canning is my absolute favorite way to preserve fresh peaches.  Peaches are also high in acid and need a very short processing time as compared to low acid food.  It should be one of the first can items for a novice.  Peaches can be canned and sweetened several different ways.  I will give all that I know as well as how to use agave nectar as well.

How to Can Peaches

Peel, cut in half, and remove pits.  Save peeling and pits later for making jelly.  This is why I do not like to scald the peaches and I feel it makes them slimy and harder to peel.  Pack peaches, raw, cavity side down into clean jars, leaving 1 inch headspace.  Follow directions below as to how to sweeten and finish:

Direct Sugar Method: Add ¼ to ½ C. granulated sugar to each quart.  Some adds up to 2/3 C., but I feel the lesser amount is better.  Fill jar to the neck with cold water.  (This is about 1 inch headspace and is for all methods).  For pint jars, use half of these amounts of sugar.

Slow-Carb Cracked Grain Bread

 

This tasty bread is rich in flavor and high in fiber! For an added “zing” grind your own flour! There’s very little white flour, and those fast carbs are balanced by the whole grain. This bread is nutritionally dense, with plenty of fiber and protein! The carbs will be digested slowly, meaning it will NOT spike your blood sugar! Fantastic for diabetes or those wanting to lose fat and build muscle!

Ingredients:

½ cup cracked grain (sold as cracked grain cereal)

1 ¼ cup water

1 package (2 ¼ tsp) active dry yeast

1/3 cup warm water (@110 degrees F)

2 Tbs butter

1 Tbs salt (Tablespoon of sea salt is best )

3Tbs baking molasses

3Tbs Agave Sweetener (or honey)

Slow Carb Sugar-Free Cake Recipe

 This quick cake is light, flavorful and satisfying! No sugar and no white flour make it healthy for diabetics & those trying to eat healthy foods!

Ingredients:

  • Raisins, 1 cup, packed 
  • Egg, fresh, 2 large 
  • Mott's Apple Juice Concentrate, (no added sugar), 3 Tbs
  • Canola Oil, .75 cup 
  • Vanilla Extract, 1 tsp 
  • Baking Soda, 1 tsp 
  • Salt, .5 tsp 
  • Cinnamon, ground, 1 tbsp 
  • Nutmeg, ground, .5 tsp 
  • Ginger, ground, 1 tbsp 
  • Walnuts, .75 cup, chopped 
  • Applesauce, unsweetened, 1 cup 
  • Soy Flour, .5 cup, stirred 
  • Whole Wheat Pastry Flour, 1.5 cup, stirred 

Plump raisins in water, drain. Toast walnuts.

Farm-to-Table Dinners Offer Local Foods, Chefs and Connections

It seems wherever we go in our area, people are talking more and more about the food they’re eating – how and where it’s grown, the people who grow it, the miles it travels to get to their plates, the quality of the food and the impact of the growing methods on the land. Here on the Eastern Shore, it is a matter of not only one of consumption but also of economics and community. Issues such as sustainability, preservation of land and farms, maintaining the Chesapeake Bay and its food sources, and continuing the rural heritage that has existed here for hundreds of years, all hit close to home.

The recent increase nationally in people’s interest and attention to local foods has spawned a movement characterized by words such as “foodie” and “slow food”, and has given rise to farm-to-table dinners across the country. The opportunity to interact with growers and vintners, and to dine in the setting on which the food is grown, has tremendous appeal to people invested in their food choices, and spending an evening over good food and wine in a natural setting, shared with like-minded diners is a unique and memorable experience

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