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DANGEROUS BEAUTY, WORKS BY LEE D’ZMURA AND TINA BROWN, ON VIEW AT ADKINS ARBORETUM

The villains of Dangerous Beauty are some of the familiar plants that make the Eastern Shore so beautiful in spring. In this show of watercolors and drawings of invasive plants, now on view at Adkins Arboretum, you will see the pretty white blossoms of Bradford pear trees, elegant purple wisteria blossoms that so often grace porch trellises, and the orange daylilies that brighten our roadsides. But as botanical artists Lee D’Zmura and Tina Brown will tell you, there’s something wrong here.

On view through July 27, with a reception on Sat., June 23 from 3 to 5 p.m., this show was six years in the making. Creating botanical art is a slow business, as the character of each plant must be faithfully reproduced, and these two artists have a message to get across.

Invasives are plants that spread aggressively outside of their natural ranges. When they colonize a new area, there are often no natural controls, such as insects, diseases or foraging animals, to keep them in check, and they may choke out native plants and destroy the food sources of native animals.

The arching prickly red stems of wineberry shown in one of Brown’s mixed media paintings have become a familiar sight in our local fields, and English ivy, illustrated in a watercolor by D’Zmura, smothers trees in many neighborhoods. Both were originally brought to North America as garden plants.

Brown explained, “Sometimes people plant them. Sometimes they come by accident.”

An example of a species that arrived by accident is the one animal in the show, the brown marmorated stink bug. In a small drawing showing the exquisitely intricate patterning on the stink bug’s shell, D’Zmura portrays the annoying insect that has quickly become all too familiar to most of us since it arrived from Asia in 1998 hidden in some packing materials.

ADKINS ARBORETUM PROGRAMS AND EVENTS MAY – AUGUST 2012

GUIDED WALKS

First Saturday Guided Walk
Saturday, May 5, 10 a.m.
Saturday, June 2, 10 a.m.
Saturday, July 7, 10 a.m.
Saturday, August 4, 10 a.m.
Explore the Arboretum’s diverse plant communities on a guided walk led by an Arboretum docent naturalist. Explore the bottomland forest and upland paths, meander through majestic beech trees, traverse the native meadows, and follow the narrow Tuckahoe Creekside path. Free for members, free with admission for the general public. 410.634.2847, ext. 0 for more information. 

Second Saturday Guided Walk
Saturday, May 12, 1 p.m.
Saturday, June 9, 1 p.m.
Saturday, July 14, 1 p.m.
Saturday, August 11, 1 p.m.

Come on a unique journey toward understanding native plants and how they can become a greater part of your home garden. Horticulturalist Eric Wittman will lead a walk about gardening with ornamental native plants. Join this walk to learn about native plants and how they can become a greater part of your home gardening experience. Free for members, free with admission for the general public. Register at adkinsarboretum.org or call 410.634.2847, ext. 0.

 

FRIDAY, MAY 11 is National Public Gardens Day. Admission is free!

BROUGHT TO LIGHT: FORMS FROM NATURE, PHOTOGRAPHS BY GEORGE HOLZER, ON VIEW AT ADKINS ARBORETUM

We think of plants being at their most beautiful when their leaves are green and their flowers are in full bloom, but think again. George Holzer’s photographs of decaying plants are drop-dead gorgeous.

On view at the Adkins Arboretum Visitor’s Center through June 1, his large, striking photos of dried leaves, seedpods and sticks elegantly spotlight the beauty and individual character of decaying plants against deep black backgrounds. There will be a reception on Sat., April 28 from 3 to 5 p.m.

Titled Brought to Light: Forms from Nature, the show includes digital IRIS prints and pigment prints from two series that Holzer has been exploring for the past three years. In Leaves and Seeds, he focuses on the unique beauty of leaves and seedpods as they decay. Reduced to barely more than a network of veins, “Eaten Leaf I” is as intricate as golden lace, while a close-up of a deformed bud, “Magnolia Bud (Mutant),” rather than seeming misshapen, is a radiant cluster of deep red and ochre scallops.

In his other series, Stick Figures, Holzer reveals his lively sense of humor by finding anthropomorphic images in broken sticks and reeds. “Dashing Stick” seems to sprint across the paper with multiple legs and arms reaching for the next step as even more limbs trail back behind. With one leaf lifted and two arching downward, “Jumping Reed” is like a ballerina springing into the air from her pointed toe.

ADKINS ARBORETUM HOSTS SEVENTH ANNUAL RACE TO CELEBRATE ARBOR DAY

Runners, walkers, families and nature enthusiasts are invited to enjoy emerging signs of spring when the Arboretum hosts its seventh annual Arbor Day Run Sat., April 7.

The event features a 5K Run, a One-Mile Family Fun Run/Walk and a 100-yard dash for kids. Participants will catch glimpses of spring as they run the cross-country trail plotted along the Arboretum’s network of scenic forest and meadow paths. Registration begins at 8 a.m., with the Kids’ Dash at 8:45 a.m. The 5K Run and Family Fun Run/Walk commence at 9 a.m.

“Green” prizes will be awarded and refreshments provided. 5K participants will receive white oak saplings in honor of Arbor Day. For fee information and to register, visit www.adkinsarboretum.org, call 410-634-2847, ext. 0 or e-mail info@adkinsarboretum.org.

2012 ART COMPETITION, DISCOVERING THE NATIVE LANDSCAPES OF MARYLAND’S EASTERN SHORE, ON VIEW THROUGH MARCH 30 AT ADKINS ARBORETUM

From the wild flurry of a flock rising over a corn field to a bright-eyed fox stalking its prey, Discovering the Native Landscapes of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Adkins Arboretum’s thirteenth annual Art Competition, is a varied portrait of the Eastern Shore. Including paintings, photographs, prints, and ceramics, the show is on view in the Arboretum Visitor’s Center through March 30. There will be a reception to meet the artists Sat., Feb. 25 from 3 to 5 p.m.

The Arboretum was honored to have Erik Neil, executive director of the Academy Art Museum in Easton, as the juror for this year’s show. Of the 122 entries drawn from as far away as California, Neil chose 22 of them to be in the show.

It was also his task to choose the winners of the annual Leon Andrus Awards. Named for the Arboretum’s first benefactor, these prizes were awarded by Neil to four of the artworks in the show.

First prize went to “Native/Invasive,” Baltimore artist Christine Neill’s nearly four-foot-tall scene combining watercolor and digital photography. Painted with confident strokes of subtle color, its two graceful plant forms float one above the other over a background of tangled underwater plants and watery reflections.

Neil said, “I selected this watercolor and digital print because I admired the ambitious scale, the sensibility of color, and the satisfying composition.”

 There’s a very different atmosphere in the second-prize winner, “Mill Creek,” an acrylic painting by Mark Wotherspoon of Dover. Still and hazy as an old mirror, its waterway runs through a wetland thickly bordered with billowing trees.

ADKINS ARBORETUM STAFF PARTICIPATES IN SENTINEL PLANT NETWORK TRAINING

Two Adkins Arboretum staff members participated recently in training at Harvard University’s Arnold Arboretum to support Adkins Arboretum’s partnership with the Sentinel Plant Network (SPN).

A collaboration between the American Public Gardens Association and the National Plant Diagnostic Network, SPN contributes to plant conservation by engaging public garden professionals, volunteers and visitors in the detection and diagnosis of high consequence pests and pathogens. The network is committed to identifying outbreaks of exotic plant pests so that strategies can be employed for their control, with the goal of avoiding devastations such as the loss of the American chestnut in the 1930s and the more recent Emerald Ash borer that is disseminated in native green ash populations.

Ridgely Old Fashioned Christmas


Sat, December 3rd  6:45 pm

Ridgely's Old Fashioned Christmas features a parade, refreshments, Santa, the lighting of the town's Christmas tree and more!  The parade begins at Martin Sutton Park at 6:45 p.m. and proceeds to Town Hall, followed by Town Hall Open House and Santa.  Contact: 410.482.8026 FREE!

RING IN THE YULETIDE WITH ADKINS ARBORETUM’S ’TIS THE SEASON HOLIDAY CELEBRATION

A unique Eastern Shore holiday tradition returns this year to Adkins Arboretum. Enjoy the magic of caroling along candle-lit woodland paths when the Arboretum hosts ’Tis the Season, a special evening of music, food, fellowship and holiday cheer, on Sat., Dec. 3 from 6 to 9 p.m.

Participants of all ages are invited to sing carols while strolling along luminaria-lined woodland paths, sip cider by a roaring bonfire, and uncover the mysteries of the winter sky with help from Delmarva Stargazers. Horse-drawn wagon rides beneath the stars will add an Eastern Shore touch to these traditional holiday festivities.

ADKINS ARBORETUM OFFERS FREE ADMISSION

Adkins Arboretum will waive admission fees on Sat., Sept. 24 in recognition of Smithsonian magazine’s seventh annual Museum Day. A celebration of culture, learning and the dissemination of knowledge, Museum Day reflects the free-admission policy of the Smithsonian Institution’s museums in Washington, D.C. Doors of museums and cultural institutions nationwide will be open free of charge.

The public is invited on Museum Day to explore the Arboretum’s 400 acres of native woodlands, wetlands, gardens and meadows along five miles of maintained paths. Visitors may also enjoy Water, Water and Water, an exhibit of Chinese ink and watercolor on rice paper by Kit-Keung Kan, and an audio tour that provides lessons about the Arboretum’s plant communities and ecology. A variety of ornamental native perennials, trees, shrubs and grasses will be for sale for fall planting. Arboretum hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Visitors can gain free admission by mentioning Museum Day or by printing tickets at http://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/.

11th Christmas Train Display

Tuesday, December 01, 2009 - Thursday, January 07, 2010
11th Christmas Train Display 
at Eagle Line Railroad, Ridgely. 7-9 p.m. free. 410-634-2785.

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